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20120930
20120930
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
.atwill change if with the programs i've talked about aif you help with job retraining and education. i am a firm liever that our america 2,000 education problem is the answer. it will take a while educate, but it is a good program. her best hope for short term is job retraining if she was thrown out of work at a defence plant. tell her it's not all that gloomy. we're the uentd states. we faced tough problems before. look when the democrats had both the white house and the congress, it was throug. can do better. the way to do better is not to tax and spend, but to retrain and get the control of the mandatory programs. i am much more apt mystic about this country than some. >> mr. perot -- mr. perot, you have one minute, sir. >> well, the defense is going to have to convert to industries. the sooner they start the sooner they'll finish. there will be a significant. it is important not to let the industrial base deteriorate. we had someone who i regret said it, in the president staff said he doesn't care if we made potato chips or computer chips, anybody that cares about it, care as great deal. you
-span and educate themselves to receive more votes. host: thank you for the call. one of your saying -- as we said earlier, ross perot sitting down for his first extended interview in many years. an interview conducted in plano, texas on thursday by richard wealth. they were agreeing to have our cameras in the room. it is a 70 minute conversation including david walker, who has been working with him on a number of initiatives to educate voters on issues in the election. the debt and deficit exceed $16 trillion. his article will appear tomorrow in usa today. we will show you an excerpt in just a moment. first some context to ross perot. when he ran as a third-party, he talked about the growing debt. \ [video clip] >> the world of a unlamented opportunity. what what they say to us if they knew by the year 2000 we will have left them with a national debt of $8 trillion? what would they say if they knew we make them the first generation of americans with a standard of living below the generation below them? we cannot do this to our children. in this election we have the opportunity to choose a candida
or blackmail our allies and friends. i want to make sure the education system fulfills its hope and promise. i've had a strong record of working with democrats and republicans in texas to make sure no child is left behind. i understand the limited role of the federal government, but it could be a constructive role when it comes to reform, by insisting that there be a strong accountability systems. my intentions are to earn your vote and earn your confidence. i'm asking for your vote. i want you to be on my team. and for those of you working, thanks from the bottom of my heart. for those of you making up your mind, i would be honored to have your support. >> vice president gore, two minutes. >> i want to thank everybody who watched and listened tonight because this is indeed a crucial time in american history. we're at a fork in the road. we have this incredible prosperity, but a lot of people have been left behind. and we have a very important decision to make. will we use the prosperity to enrich all of our families and not just a few? indeed a crucial time in american history. we're at a for
in education, the goal was not just to build a dam, not just to build a school, but to improve the capacity, to build the capacity, of the potential government. when you talk to most pakistanis, you say, you give it to who? but it is worth it. we work with the government of pakistan. i would argue it is a failure. not a total failure. i think they got some results and continued to. it was a failure in the vision that we would build the kind of partnership with pakistan, with a capable pakistan that we wanted. those of you who read the book, and those of you who have not should not be in this room, will understand and buy that premise, as i do, that with a very weak state and a strong society, the problem with putting all of that commitment into that week state is flawed. if there are not so many beggars in pakistan, but because of social, tribal, and local structures, it is worth paying attention to the fact that that is the way pakistan is governed and investing in the prospects for a strong state with a state in that situation is fraught with risk. that risk happened. that is one flaw in
private prisons, education to more recently military and security issues has been put outward with much rhetoric, but not a lot of evidence in terms of cost effect it has, for example. my question is simply, how much reflects a blind faith in the precepts of the marketplace and adam smith and how much is attached to corporations that will benefit them in the future? i've written a book on the subject with respect to military contractors with little purple evidence. >> i see the correlation is inverted. it is more expensive and you get less out of it. we have seen how well halliburton dead when they took over the logistics of the army. the army cannot feed itself anymore, which is kind of ridiculous. look at other scandals in iraq can you see these across the board. national security badges is what i did and at some point it struck me as overwhelming that these things were not working as the vonage had claimed they would work. and there are some things that not only because of cost effect of mass i don't want some contract to looking at sensitive surveillance intelligence. i don't want s
to get to advance women and women making advancements in college education, in even doctors biology, chemistry, education. you're still seeing this bias in the sciences. are we ever going to overcome it? >> interestingly enough it turns out at yale, they have some of the higher numbers for women in the stem program. 39-46% of their women or of their students in that program are female and i think last year they had around 40 something percent graduation rate where the national average is 38%. what bothers or concerns me with this is some of this is still unfortunately, biased and prejudices. both from men and women. and that's really human nature and how do we get beyond that? because i think part of it, you see with the study that some women graded men higher and that's because they thought the guy was really more qualified or are you afraid you might lose your position? on the other side of that coin is where men, the bias is that do you want to keep an old boy's network or open up for women? so the other thing that i think we are working on but need to work hard ser to encourage
to lead us in an all- out search to advance our education, our learning, and our science and training, because this world is more complex and we're being pressed harder all the time. i believe in opening doors. we won the olympics, in part, because we've had civil rights laws and the laws that prohibit discrimination against women. i have been for those efforts all my life. the president's record is quite different. the question is our future. president kennedy once said in response to similar arguments, "we are great, but we can be greater.'' we can be better if we face our future, rejoice in our strengths, face our problems, and by solving them, build a better society for our children. thank you. >> thank you, mr. mondale. [applause] please, we have not finished quite yet. thank you, mr. mondale, and thank you, mr. president. and our thanks to our panel members, as well. and so we bring to a close this first of the league of women voters presidential debates of 1984. you two can go at each again in the final league debate on october 21st, in kansas city, missouri. and this thursday
and women make different choices in the workplace. they make different choices starting in education. you see more young men and majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature. fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofit. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more than an investment banks in computer science. there isn't any reason that these two group should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man at a woman in an investment bank though that goldman sachs should be paid the same. they are paid the same and if they are not there are avenues to sue. but that is the big difference. >> what do you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> well i think the white house leak has a counsel on men and boys because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far h
. they boenlt have a high degree of education and both knowledgebling. i think we're lucky to have two great people running in the elections, especially given how they are. >> you have all these investments around america and increedingly around the world. what is your sense of the american economy? there are some signs that the economy is actually beginning to recover. housing is back. but yet the actual gdp numbers don't seem to move much. what do you think? >> there are some good sighs. housing has moved back a little bit. we've had a boon in energy. so -- and consumers have paid down a lot of debt. the bad side is there's an increasing government debt at the state and federal level. if you think back in 1982 this was a large outcry when the national debt passed 1 trillion. we're now adding 1 trillion per euro. soon the interest of the national debt could equal the whole amount in 1982 when you and i were here. i think it's a huge problem and a real problem. i'm hopeful that when the government forms that cob will address this problem. we've had such a polarized cob. that's part of the wh
in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> welcome back. sheila bair was the chairman of the federal deposit insurance corporation from 2006 to 2011. charged with guaranteeing the stability and public confidence of the nation's financial system. a tough job in the midst of the 2008 financial crisis. today she's the author of "bull by the horns: fighting to save main street from wall street and wall street from itself." sheila, great to have you on the program. welcome. >> thank you for having me. >> when it comes to the $700 billion bank bailout four years ago, you write in your book "to this day i wonder if we overreacted." was it too much. >> i think it was too much. it was misdirected. shared a lot of money with large financial institutions and made sure they maybe profitable but not enough on restructuring mortgages and foreclosure prevention. >> do you think it was this panic that was going on that you just felt everybody needed money toward the banks? >> it was. i think in late
foreclosures. those children the scars, if you like him in the educational personal development for years to come. every time i hear some conservative politician explained why we haven't got the resources to do something about unemployment. another one of these economic downturns of capitalism. i scratch my head because even the most conservative calculation would indicate the cost of not doing something are larger and not to have been undertaken long ago, just as in this case, not to pursue far pushy foreignness, but just as in this case the most stunning thing if you are a normal thinking person, would be to ask yourself, let's see, the last time we had a crisis like this, the last time capitalism's instability took this terrible turn in the 1930s, something very different happened and is happening now. major steps were taken by democratic presidents come and middle of the road are, but suddenly everything changed and he wasn't a big middle of the voter. he suddenly became something else and did a lot of things for the mass of people. none of those are being done now. that is a remarkab
's trying to do for education. her plate launches a competition to fill a critical national need. it would help the public-private partnerships. the fund would come from money america currently spends on economic development. thanks for joining us. >> you bet. thanks for having me on, ali. >> how do you ensure that we undertake projects using private and public money that do create jobs and fix problems as opposed to the accusation that we get from a lot of conservatives that say, these things are just pork. >> first of all, in states it's happening all the time, anyway. every state almost has an economic development agency that has identified that state's strengths, weaknesses and opportunities. a swat analysis, if you will, and they decided to focus on areas of strength inside the state's geographic borders. what i'm suggesting is to put that kind of effort on steroids, n knowing our economic allies, they aren't being that aggressive. how do you make sure it's effective? you want to make sure the government's dollar is the last dollar in. or if it's a tax incentive, which is really a but
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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